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Another Wednesday in NYC meant another trip to Midtown Comics–and another week of plucking top-shelf books from the middle of the Great Wall O’Comics.

  • Fatale #16 (Read it!  Solid, sure, but not as transcendent as it’s been.  No real missteps, just didn’t get the feeling I typically get during and after reading.  Hey: it’s bound to happen–especially with the titles that kill it from issue to issue.)
Fatale #16

Fatale #16

  • Dial H #15 (Read it!  A crazy, convoluted concoction–everything we’ve come to love about this misfit book!  Too bad it couldn’t really find its place in the DCU–or an audience.  We sure as heck did our best to promote it; but, alas, it wasn’t enough.  From the get-go, however, it was clear: Dial H wasn’t a terribly accessible title.  Thank you China Mieville, Alberto Ponticelli, Dan Green, Mateus Santolouco, Dave Lapham, and Brian Bolland for dialing me dizzy for fifteen fantastic issues.)
  • Buck Rogers #1 (Read it!  Howard Chaykin’s always worth a shot.  Here, though, probably just this one.  While it read well enough, it didn’t quite clear the bar, which is set pretty darned high–especially for outliers like this.  Hey: as much as I’d like to, I can’t read everything!)
  • Sheltered #2 (Read it!  A very strong follow up to a superb opening act.  Looks like Brisson might really have something here.)
Sheltered #2

Sheltered #2

  • Daredevil: Dark Nights #3 (Read it!  Some impressive twists weighed down just a bit by some inevitable schmaltz, especially related to what’s been driving DD to complete his mission of mercy.)
  • Ten Grand #4 (Read it!  Glad I’ve stuck around.  I’ve found myself drawn to Joe and to how Joe’s been drawn–and colored–by the terrific Ben Templesmith.)
Ten Grand #4

Ten Grand #4

  • All-New X-Men #15 (Read it!  Once again, an issue that accomplishes very little.  Feels like we’re just killing time leading up to the big crossover event.  Has felt that way for a while, actually.)
  • Sidekick #1 (Read it!  I liked it more than I didn’t.  What kept me from loving it?  It’s the battle that rages amongst the pages: a battle for the ages between clever and cliche.  Kudos to DerekNerd for noticing that this reads like a Mark Millar book.  If you didn’t think of it before, I bet you’re noticing it now.)
  • The Manhattan Projects #13 (Read it!  Same old, same old.  And by that, I mean super good.  Hickman, Pitarra, and Bellaire never take a month off.  Oh, and how about that JFK?)
  • Helheim #6 (Read it!  Everything you’d expect from a Cullen Bunn book.  Pretty terrific final page, no?)
  • Shadowman #9 (Read it!  Another solid issue.)
Shadowman #9

Shadowman #9

  • Quantum and Woody #2 (Read it!  Really liked the beginning.  Asmus kicks off the second installment with a clever conversation–between Woody and me!–and some intelligent humor.  In fact, I was thinking top of the pile for the week.  However, it got a bit sophomoric–and jokingly homophobic–as the issue progressed.  I get it: it’s meant to amplify Woody’s immaturity; but I think, in the end, it detracted from the development of the story.)
  • Trillium #1 (Read it!  One word–for now anyway: finally.)
Trillium #1

Trillium #1

  • Satellite Sam #2 (Read it!  Issue #1 was one of my favorites for July, and there’s no let up here.  Fantastic follow up from Fraction and Chaykin.  So fabulously different from everything else.)

What a way to kick off the month!

What did you get in your bag?  Anything worth checking out?

Turning pages,

Scott

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