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This’ll be my inaugural haul from the new and improved Android’s Amazing Comics.  Looks like it’ll be a grand opening, indeed!

  • The Wake #9 (DC/Vertigo): Scott Snyder’s overhyped submersible vehicle draws–drowns?–closer to its long awaited end.  By long awaited, I mean this thing could’ve been a sixer.  Am I wrong?  Of course I’m not wrong.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #34 (IDW): Any hype this one’s been getting has been well earned. The Turtles are serious business, boys and girls: Waltz and Eastman have managed the considerable cast remarkably well, all along allowing the child at the heart of the book to play innocently while the adults are getting work done–no easy task; and, speaking of getting work done, artist Mateus Santolouco lifts the lot to another level with his signature style–one that has quickly become the face of the titular freaky foursome.
  • Clone #17 (Image): Issue after issue David Schulner and co. unveil another perfectly engineered model of their fast-paced formula, taking hairpin page turns toward high-octane twists!  #16, an anxious affair, made more so by Juan Jose Ryp’s insanely detailed artwork and Andy Troy’s committed colors, delivers a real shot to the gut; and we’re left bleeding and pleading, “More, please.”
Clone #17

Clone #17

  • The Superannuated Man #1 (Image): Yeah, I don’t know.  I didn’t care for Miniature Jesus so much.  Ted McKeever’s worth a try, though, ain’t he?  No doubt the art’ll be really good.  My concern: the writing side.  I mean, you did read Miniature Jesus, right?  Rough.  Sound idea, noisy delivery.
The Superannuated Man #1

The Superannuated Man #1

  • Iron Fist: The Living Weapon #3 (Marvel): Kaare Andrews definitely deserves an iron fist bump or two for this randy reboot of K’Un Lun’s favorite son.  His images and words come together like yin and yang, balancing Danny’s heartbreaking backstory with the apocalyptic present.  It’s Kung Fu Theater in a comic!
  • Loki: Agent of Asgard #5 (Marvel): Loving Loki, Midgard’s most magical metrosexual!  The star of the show, though, is Al Ewing’s wit, which is sharper even than Sigurd’s Gram.  That’s right: I’m all about Asgard–and it only took four issues to bring me around!
  • Magneto #5 (Marvel): Magneto the Merciless.  Me likey.  Cullen Bunn’s already shown a knack for delivering magnetic moments, making a raging Magneto easy to root for–especially as he works in vane to cleanse a faux farm of Purifiers.  Did you notice: the death by windmill was literally–and cleverly–foreshadowed on the side of the barn over the course of three scene-shifting panels!
  • Miles Morales: Ultimate Spider-Man #2 (Marvel): #1 brought us back to what made Ultimate Spider-Man work: Bendis’s surrendering super in favor of human.  There’s magic in Miles, after all.  And, damn, how about that last page?  One of those rare times when petering out is a good thing.
Miles Morales: Ultimate Spider-Man #2

Miles Morales: Ultimate Spider-Man #2

  • Miracleman #7 (Marvel): Running a bit behind.  Still haven’t gotten around to #5.  But what I’ve read so far has been miraculous.
  • Moon Knight #4 (Marvel): Loved #3.  Just one reason: “You possess all kinds of armor and raiment for fighting the living: how can you not have garments for fighting the dead?”  I mean, duh!  Warren Ellis knows exactly how to exploit this medium: he wields his words efficiently and allows Declan Shalvey to once again spread his wings.  Together, they deliver a powerful punch and, with that narrative fist, continue to fill the cavernous Batvoid in my life.  Thanks, fellas!
Moon Knight #4

Moon Knight #4

  • Caliban #3 (Avatar): Solid sci-fi from Garth Ennis.  It’s a mash up–appropriately enough, considering–of his Red Team and Alien, ain’t it?  So, I’m still on board.
  • Doc Savage #6 (Dynamite): Starting to lose a little steam for me as it chugs its way to the present.  I bought the Annual but don’t really feel compelled to read it, you know, with the different creative team and all.  Just doesn’t inspire.  Helluva a price tag on that sucker, too.  We’re back to business–and back to Y2K–with this one.
  • Quantum and Woody #11 (Valiant): Crazy fun!  I cannot wait for the showdown with the E.R.A.  I’m telling you: if you like Rat Queens, you’ll definitely dig Q&W.  James Asmus has really found a groove–and his needle sharp wit is riding it at 78 rpm, delivering sweet, sweet music, man; and Kano, the Bono of comic book artists, has, with #10, delivered the most vocal visuals of the series to date.
Quantum and Woody #11

Quantum and Woody #11

  • Rai #2 (Valiant): I didn’t love #1, but I’m going to give it–Matt Kindt, more so, if I’m being honest–another issue.  Wasn’t going to, except for the fact that #1 read a lot like Star Wars: Rebel Heist #1, which I ended up enjoying more after I thought about it for a while.  Here’s hoping that Rai #2 will give me something to think about.  Clayton Crain’s painted art didn’t live up to expectations.  Don’t get me wrong it’s impressive for what it is; but in terms of the storytelling, it’s stiff and lifeless.  More hoping: that the images catch up to the words.

What are you looking forward to this week?

Turning pages,

Scott

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