What’s I&N Store (5/20)

Relatively small week with some big books.

  • Archie Vs. Predator #2 (Dark Horse)
  • B.P.R.D.: Hell on Earth #131 (Dark Horse)
  • Mind MGMT #33 (Dark Horse) I&N Demand

 

Mind MGMT #33

Mind MGMT #33

  • The Fade Out #6 (Image)
  • Satellite Sam #14 (Image) I&N Demand
Satellite Sam #14

Satellite Sam #14

  • Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #4 (Image) I&N Demand
Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #4

Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #4

  • Daredevil 15.1 (Marvel)
  • Moon Knight #18 (Marvel)
  • Uncanny X-Men #34 (Marvel)
  • Bloodshot: Reborn #2 (Valiant)
  • Cap Stone #6 (Titan)
  • Mono Vol.2 #2 (Titan) I&N Demand
Mono Vol. 2 #2

Mono Vol. 2 #2

  • Ninjak #3 (Valiant)
  • Oh, Killstrike #1 (BOOM!) Just I&N
Oh, Killstrike #1

Oh, Killstrike #1

Avery’s Pick of the Week

  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic #30
My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic #30

My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic #30

What are you looking forward to this week?

Turning pages,

Scott

What’s I&N Store (5/13)

Instead of catching up, I’ve been catching the following:

  • colds (thanks to the kids, who’ve left their snot spigots open all week long)
  • hell (plenty of hell from an evil assortment of devils)
  • drifts (from the passive-aggressive posse with whom I ride)
  • eyes and z’s (for all the wrong reasons and for all the right reasons–in that order)
  • 22 (couldn’t help myself)
  • as catch can’t (’cause that’s how I roll–or don’t roll, as it were; better: that’s how I sit in one place and spit in the o of progress)

Typing of catching: I hope to catch these 22-page fireflies in my little brown bag on Wednesday:

  • Harrow County #1 (Dark Horse): Bunn’s pretty much hit (The Sixth Gun, Magneto) or miss (The Empty Man, Moon Knight, Wolf Moon, Magneto).  Hoping for a hit here.  Wondering how it’s going fit next to all of the other witch-related titles that have been summoned to the shelves of late. (Some high-profile hags hanging out with Harrow County: Rachel Rising, Wytches, and Sabrina.)  They’re popping up almost as quickly as the now ubiquitous time-traveling titles.  Right?  I mean, what’s up with that?
  • Lady Killer #5 (Dark Horse): I&N Demand The end has come far too quickly.  Has really been a great ride.  Praying that this final issue lives up to the standard that Jones and Rich have set for themselves; that it doesn’t drop off like–like a fella off the red roof of a terrifically tall structure at a World’s Fair.  (That’s right analogy lovers: I’ve got you covered.)  Anything less would be a huge blow to what has, through four issues, established itself as the front runner for the min-series of the year.

Lady Killer #5

Lady Killer #5

  • Rebels #2 (Dark Horse): I&N Demand I liked the whole April Morning vibe to the opening of #1.  Left me wondering if–though semi-certain that–Wood had Fast’s novel in mind.  No doubt about it: I’m along for the ride–even if it’s not so revolutionary.  Will it fill The Massive void?  Time will tell.
Rebels #2

Rebels #2

  • Astro City #23 (DC/Vertigo): #22 was nice.  Unfortunately, I’m getting to a point where nice just ain’t gonna cut it anymore.  I’m this close to leaving Astro City for good.
  • East of West #19 (Image): Suddenly our sci-fi spin on Revelations has become a compelling sci-fi spin–with a Wool-y twist–on The Red Balloon.  Translation: it’s apocalypsally delicious!
  • Injection #1 (Image): Just I&N One issue of Moon Knight gave me a taste for this team; the next five left me an addict fiending for more.  Clearly, this book is meant to satisfy the craving.
Injection #1

Injection #1

  • The Mantle #1 (Image): I swore off Brisson after Sheltered blew up in my face.  Yet here I am.  Typing of volcanoes: here’s The Mantle: superhero fare that’ll either be hot or not.  If it’s the latter, I’m out immediately.
  • Mythic #1 (Image): Ghostbusters meets Thomas Alsop.  For $1.99, it’s worth a shot–if only to enjoy the magic of John McCrea.
  • ODY-C #5 (Image): I’ve been enjoying it more for Fraction’s creative vision than anything else.
  • Saga #28 (Image): Tension’s building.  So far, sa-ga.
  • Magneto #18 (Marvel): Oh, yay!  It’s a Secret Wars tie-in.
  • Thor #8 (Marvel): I&N Demand To helmet with it!
Thor #8

Thor #8

  • Giant Days #3 (BOOM!): I&N Demand OK, so, as one might expect, #2 wasn’t as giant a surprise as #1.  Couldn’t have been, for obvious reasons.  Still, it lived up to suddenly inflated expectations–and did so with a ripping wit that refuses to take a panel off.  Oh, what fun!
Giant Days #3

Giant Days #3

  • Blackcross #3 (Dynamite): It’s clear that I’m super late to this grim super-powered party.  Ellis, however, has made me feel welcome.  He’s got a knack for that, no?
  • Lantern City #1 (BOOM!): I loved Jenkins’ Deathmatch–so, too, did DC (Convergence) and Marvel (Secret Wars), apparently–so I’ll try just about anything he’s got a hand in–especially when the premise sounds good, as it does here.
  • Space Riders #2 (Black Mask): A Derekommendation!  With books like We Can Never Go Home and Mayday–and now this!–seems like Black Mask is positioning itself to take over the effing industry.  We’ll follow them all the way–especially if they keep pumping out top-of-the-pile material.
  • X-O Manowar #36 (Valiant): Venditti and his charge–the indomitable Aric–just keep plugging along.

Avery’s Pick of the Week:

My Little Pony: Friendship Forever #16 (IDW): So long, fiends!  It’s always been about friends!

My Little Pony: Friends Forever

My Little Pony: Friends Forever #16

What are you looking forward to this week?

Turning pages,

Scott

What’s I&N Store (5/6)

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These are the books I will use to recover from the stress–and ultimate release of the same–of the week–stress months in the making–which will peak, appropriately enough, on Thank-God-It’s-Wednesday.

  • Neverboy #3 (Dark Horse)
  • No Mercy #2 (Image): I&N Demand With #1, Alex De Campi and Carla Speed McNeil have proven there’s no such thing as “too much Magic Bus.”  What a surprise!  I’ll not be caught off guard again.
No Mercy #2

No Mercy #2

  • The Wicked & The Divine #10 (Image)
  • Zero #16 (Image): I&N Demand #15 was pretty effing brilliant.  It’s the kind of queer, out-of-nowhere story that burrows into your brain like an ill-advised bullet.  So, so good.  Oh yeah, it gave me a raging–well, it gave me a raging cover to #16.
Zero #16

Zero #16

  • Ant-Man #5 (Marvel): I&N Demand Ant-Man: it’s more than a cheap movie tie-in, that’s for sure.  It’s a book with a big funny bone and an even bigger heart.  Nick Spencer’s found the perfect outlet in a seemingly irrelevant title–one that’d be easily overlooked, if not for our magnifying its unanticipated brilliance.  Puns and self-aggrandizement completely intended.
Ant-Man #5

Ant-Man #5

  • Secret Wars #1 (Marvel)
  • Afterlife With Archie #8 (Archie Horror): I&N Demand A stunning Archievement!  It’s a book fueled by the comfy couch of nostalgia–a book that drives you to the edge of your seat by burning the cushions, the fire started by exuberantly rubbing Riverdale-related expectations together.  And zombies.
Afterlife With Archie #8

Afterlife With Archie #8

  • Arcadia #1 (BOOM!) Just I&N Sounds Matrix-y.  I’m down.
Arcadia #1

Arcadia #1

  • Dead Drop #1 (Valiant)
  • Rachel Rising #33 (Abstract Studio)
  • Über #24 (Avatar)
  • We Can Never Go Home #2 (Black Mask) I&N Demand #1 was really, really great.  I know, right?  Who knew?  That’s why we try ’em, folks.  Reminds of the solid They’re Not Like Us (Image), which is, ironically, still looking for its voice; and brings to mind the villainously heroic Dry Spell, which we just so happened to celebrate as our #3 book of 2014.  Super-high praise for an out-of-nowhere title, no?  If you missed it, don’t fret: Black Mask delivered a second printing this week.  It may be that you can never go home, but luckily you can always go to your local comic shop.  Do yourself a favor: grab that and this.  
We Can Never Go Home #2

We Can Never Go Home #2

Avery’s Picks of the Week

  • Scooby-Doo Team-Up #10 (DC): Of all the books I’ve bought Avery over the past couple of years, it’s the Scooby-Doo titles that reign as the most reread.  Ruh-ray!
Scooby-Doo Team-Up #10

Scooby-Doo Team-Up #10

  • Feathers #5 (BOOM!)

What are you looking forward to this week?

Turning pages,

Scott

What’s I&N Store (4/29)

Papers piling up.  Comics piling up.

These are not your grandfather’s piles.

Thank God.

  • PastAways #2 (Dark Horse)
  • Astro City #22 (DC/Vertigo)
  • The Multiversity #2 (DC): I&N Demand The Multiversity and Convergence existing in the same time, in the same space, doing pretty much the same thing–it’s no surrpise, really: yeah, this is DC’s WTF campaign rebranded and repackaged.  It’s an in-house secret war, with the money–clearly–on the upstart Convergence.  Morrison’s The Multiversity, however, reflects an immutable truth: good writing is good writing–and bad writing needs a balls-out marketing campaign.
The Multiversity #2

The Multiversity #2

  • Superman #40 (DC)
  • G.I. Joe #8 (IDW)
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #45 (IDW): I&N Demand TMNT was on my chopping block last month, and then they had to go and chop…  Hey: if you read #44, you know what I’m talking about.  If you didn’t, well, then, chop, chop!  Get on that!
TMNT #45

TMNT #45

  • Alex + Ada #14 (Image)
  • They’re Not Like Us #5 (Image)
  • Daredevil #15 (Marvel)
  • Moon Knight #14 (Marvel)
  • Silver Surfer #11 (Marvel): I&N Demand Silver Surfer has been otherworldly.
Silver Surfer #11

Silver Surfer #11

  • Brides of Helheim #5 (Oni)
  • Burning Fields #4 (BOOM!)
  • Godkiller: Walk Among Us #4 (Black Mask)
  • Hit 1957 #2 (BOOM!)
  • Mayday #1 (Black Mask)
  • Quantum and Woody Must Die #4 (Valiant)
  • The Twilight Zone: Shadow & Substance #4 (Dynamite)
  • War Stories #8 (Avatar)

Avery’s Pick of the Week

  • My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #5 (IDW)
My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #5

My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #5

What are you looking forward to this week?

Turning all sorts of pages,

Scott

What’s I&N Store (4/22)

For you, I&Nmates–you completists, you: the soul of wit:

  • Frankenstein Underground #2 (Dark Horse)
  • Mind MGMT #32 (Dark Horse) I&N Demand
Mind MGMT #32

Mind MGMT #32

  • Mister X: Razed #3 (Dark Horse) I&N Demand
Mister X: Razed #3

Mister X: Razed #3

  • Suiciders #3 (DC/Vertigo)
  • Drones #1 (IDW)
  • Invisible Republic #2 (Image) I&N Demand
Invisible Republic #2

Invisible Republic #2

  • Lazarus #16 (Image) I&N Demand
Lazarus #16

Lazarus #16

  • Satellite Sam #13 (Image) I&N Demand
Satellite Sam #13

Satellite Sam #13

  • Velvet #10 (Image)
  • The Black Hood #3 (Archie)
  • Cap Stone #5 (Titan)
  • Divinity #3 (Valiant)
  • Mono Vol. 2 #1 (Titan) Just I&N
Mono Vol. 2 #1

Mono Vol. 2 #1

  • Ninjak #2 (Valiant)

Avery’s Pick of the Week

  • My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #4 (IDW)

What are you looking forward to this week?

Turning pages,

Scott

What’s I&N Store (4/15)

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Gosh!  I’m so late with this that I’ve already read three of ’em.

I wanna read another; so…

  • Archie vs. Predator #1 (Dark Horse) Just I&N OK, so, like, well, everyone else, I pretty much discovered the Archie-verse with Afterlife and regretted not having visited Riverdale more often after reading–along with everyone else–Life With Archie #36.  (Heck of a time to jump on board, eh?)  Despite my last-second, Scotty-come-lately Archievement, I was pretty settled on passing on this one.  I mean, it sounds silly–sure, like Afterlife didn’t–and I didn’t know from Alex De Campi–until I read No Mercy (Image), which was really, really good.  So, yeah, I’ve gone from I don’t care to Just I&N–just like that!
Archie vs. Predator #1

Archie vs. Predator #1

  • BPRD: Hell on Earth #130 (Dark Horse): As solid a read as your gonna find.
  • Millennium #4 (IDW): It’s not just Jordan, folks: it’s adult Jordan!  That move’s a slam dunk in my book!   After three issues, there’s no doubt: this is for hardcore Millennium fans only.  Good thing I make a point of watching all three seasons on DVD every summer.  Heh.  Who knew that old practice would come in handy some day?  Oh, but it has: it’s kept me so very ready for the further adventures of Frank Black.
  • The Fade Out #5 (Image): Honesty: I remember liking #4, but I can’t remember what the hell happened.  Rrrrrrrrrrrr <—-That’s my avoiding using an obvious pun.
  • Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #3 (Image) I&N Demand #1 was our #3 book of February.  #2 didn’t quite reach that level, but it still scratched that itch.
Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #3

Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #3

  • Magneto #17 (Marvel): Erik’s past has come back to haunt him.  No, not that past.  Not that one, either.  It’s his past-past, his waaaay past–his WWII past: a Nazi tormentor has come to Genosha; he’s murdering mutants and promising to murder more.  There’s no way Erik can abide that.  Something tells me revenge is in the offing–after he cleans off his bathroom mirror with some disinfectant spray, of course.
  • Thor #7 (Marvel): We’re getting closer to the big reveal.  Series-wise: Aaron has delivered some strong moments–some naturally powerful moments; but they’ve been routinely undermined–destroyed, even!–by awfully obvious moments–made-up girl-power moments that would make Margaret Atwood cringe.
  • Uncanny X-Men #33 (Marvel): The X-Verse has been falling apart for some time now.  Took me long enough, but I’ve finally given up on All-New.  I should’ve given up on this one, too.  So, so terrible.  #31 had Cyclops berated by some nobody student in a moment that felt as unauthentic as Harper Row’s inexplicably lighting into Batman back in Batman #whocares; #32 saw him knocked out by Gold Balls.  No, really: he was hit in the head with Gold Balls’ gold balls.  This one looks like it’s going to be another patented X-filler issue.  It’s Unnecessary X-Men #33!  Yeah, I think it’s time.
  • Bloodshot: Reborn #1 (Valiant): I’m off Descender and All-New Hawkeye after trying two of each.  Believe me: I want to love something that Jeff Lemire’s writing; I really do.  That’s why I keep trying.  And here I am, trying again.
  • Crossed +100 #4 (Avatar) I&N Demand Alan Moore’s brought a touch of Burgess to his narration and dialogue, making his take on Ennis’s mad, mad, mad, mad world read like A Crossedwork Red.  No joke: #3 was not an easy read; but there’s still something terribly compelling about it, mainly because Moore’s clearly building–and patiently so–toward something–something big, maybe something not so big at all, who knows?  Maybe he’s forging headlong into the heart of darkness, which he’s done before, and which would mean we’re in for a Conradian adventure–one that’s an exercise in superhuman patience.  Because, let’s be honest, we all know that anything worth having is worth the work–and the wait.  That’s what I skull, anyway.
  • Giant Days #2 (BOOM!) I&N Demand I had no idea what to expect from Giant Days.  Maybe that’s why I ended up loving it as much as I did.  Could also be because it’s just that good.  Damn thing’s hilarious.  Keep an eye out: I’m going to fight to include #1 in our Top 5 for March.
  • Chilling Adventures of Sabrina #2 (Archie) I&N Demand Man, I’ve been waiting for this.  #1 was one of my favorite single issues of 2014.  It was so good–so much better than that other, over-hyped wytch-themed book that overshadowed it; you know, the one that cast a spell with its creators’ names but ended up delivering a real wooden piece of “CHHIT.”  No, Sabrina does everything right: it’s a masterclass in storytelling–in juxtaposition, in pacing, and most important, in horror–from Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa–the genius behind Afterlife With Archie–and the panel-perfect Robert Hack.  What a mind-eff, no?  Seems the comic book home of true terror is Archie Horror!
  • The Sixth Gun: Dust to Dust #3 (Oni): Yay!  I get to add another issue to my Sixth Gun pile.

Avery’s Pick of the Week

  • My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #3 (IDW): Avery’s Grammy saw #2, read the title through Fiendship, and stopped short with an “Oh.”  I assured her that it’s a series about some of the Pony villains.  Turns out that my definition of assured isn’t the same as hers.
My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #3

My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #3

What are you looking forward to this week?

Turning pages,

Scott

Top 5 Books of February

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For all of you keeping score, here it is: our Top 5 Books of February!

5. Satellite Sam #11 (Image): Waking life–and death!  Matt Fraction and Howard Chaykin are as masterful as ever as alarm bells go off, eyes open, and metaphors deliver their lines with ironic conviction.  This thickly-themed and perfectly-timed issue sees the largely unlikable ensemble cast dissembled and reassembled, self-serving agendas selflessly serving as the common thread that binds the lot together on this very, very good morning. (SC)

Satellite Sam #11

Satellite Sam #11

4. Ant-Man #2 (Marvel): How did this book, easily dismissed as a cynical corporate media tie-in, make it into our bag, much less our hallowed Top 5? Well, one could mention the appealing heart in a story about a down-on-his-luck divorced father who’s willing to do anything to be near his daughter. Or one could point to the clean, appealing art by Ramon Rosanas and Jordan Boyd. All true, but what separates this book from the congested, middle of the road superhero pack is that it is so. Damn. Funny. We mean it folks: not LOL funny, but quite literally Laugh-Out-Loud funny. People on the train giving me strange looks as I’m guffawing at a freaking comic book funny. Any comic, hell anything, that can engender such a visceral reaction is aces in my book. So let’s just come out and say it: Nick Spencer is the funniest writer working in funny books today. (DM)

Ant-Man #2

Ant-Man #2

3. Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #1 (Image): With a sly “Hi,” David Lapham welcomes us back to the next round of Bullets: a lone gunman–a coldly fetching Kretchmeyer–is hunted down by series vet, the brooding Spanish Scott, a calculating killer himself, who is, let’s be honest, more siesta than fiesta.  Scott’s lethargic inevitability–you know, like death itself–is integral to the development of the issue-spanning tension, especially as it mirrors the dangerously direct and determined Kretchmeyer’s own semisomnambulistic nature.  Lapham brings the two together, guns drawn, in an unforgettable–and emphatically phallic–panel that finds Beth, one seriously distressed damsel, an extremely interested party who quite literally doesn’t want to lose her head.  Yeah, it’s vintage Stray Bullets, folks: it’s fun; it’s violent, and it’s tight–it’s “another [effing] hole-in-one.” (SC)

Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #1

Stray Bullets: Sunshine and Roses #1

2. Silver Surfer #9 (Marvel): The little engine that could.  The ant with high apple-pie-in-the-sky hopes.  Buster Douglas.  Life.   Yeah, we’ve got a thing for the underdog; it’s hardwired; heck, it’s about survival–our own survival that we fight for vicariously through whatever odds-against scenario we’re privy to in the moment.  That’s what makes this issue of Silver Surfer so affective–so blisteringly painful.  Dan Slott and Mike Allred do more than just continue the brilliant course set in #8, our #2 book of January; they ride it to greater emotional heights, selling the Surfer’s inspirational effort of “surfing the moon,” only to–in the blast of an eye–reveal the tack’s ultimate value: none.  Yeah, seems Galactus is no Goliath, and the Surfer–stripped of the power cosmic–is the Surfer no more.  But his defeat doesn’t leave us feeling defeated.  Oh, no it doesn’t.  Despite the bleak ending–maybe because of the bleak ending–we’re built up even more; we’re even more defiant, more hopeful.  See: hope is our heroin, and thanks to the low note struck at the end, we are super high and primed for the return of our hero in a month’s time–primed for victory–because the little guy always wins–right? (SC)

Silver Surfer #9

Silver Surfer #9

1. Mister X: Razed #1 (Dark Horse): We honored Dean Motter’s previous installment Mister X: Eviction with the 2014 Innie Award for Best Limited Series. So expectations were high for his new collection. Well, we’re happy to report those expectations have been met and surpassed. In a book that already wears such stylish influences as Will Eisner and Fritz Lang, this issue boasts a gorgeous ensemble of O. Henry with just a dash of Edgar Allan Poe (in the undergarments) to weave a seamless, pulpy dream. You won’t find a better looking (or reading) book this season!

Seriously, Motter has spent years building up the fantastic, darkly surreal playground that is Radiant City. Now we get the supreme pleasure of just sitting back and watching the master play. (DM)

Mister X: Razed #1

Mister X: Razed #1

Biggest Dis(appointment): Moon Knight #12 (Marvel) – Brian Wood takes a fascinating, morally fraught premise – Khnoshu abandons Marc Spector and bestows the mantle of Moon Knight on someone who’s willing to murder a head of state for his past crimes against humanity – and ends it with a cop out. Spoiler alert! Turns out the new Moon Knight was just after his money! A weak ending that invalidates a riveting, timely premise. A true let-down. (DM)

Moon Knight #12

Moon Knight #12

Turning pages,

Scott & Derek

I&N Review: TERRORIST by Henrik Rehr

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61kKFmJgB8L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

By Derek Mainhart

What makes someone become a terrorist? It’s a question with some urgency at this point; one that, given recent events, is particularly resonant with cartoonists. In his new book Terrorist: Gavrilo Princip, the Assassin who Ignited World War I, cartoonist Henrik Rehr explores the mixture of ideology, desperation and political circumstance that are at the root of the phenomenon. Rehr’s vehicle for this exploration is perhaps the most infamous terrorist act in history.

Starting at birth, Rehr traces the forces that shape his subject, Gavrilo Princip: from his grandfather’s nationalistic stories of Serbia’s past glory, through the repression and indignity of daily life under occupation, first by the Turks, then the Austrians. Lacking any real education or prospects due to his second class status, Gavrilo’s idle days are filled at cafes digesting the news of the time with friends whose radicalization slowly, frighteningly, transforms from theoretical braggadocio to cold, irreversible action. As young Gavrilo (he was nineteen when he assassinated the Archduke) and his cohorts engage in ever more dangerous behavior, Rehr pulls off the neat trick of having the reader, fully aware of the historical implications of their actions, still feel anxious for their safety. He accomplishes this by skillfully interspersing telling, personal moments (Gavrilo’s sweetly naive relationship with his girlfriend, the family life of a reluctant co-conspirator), humanizing the principle actors.

As counterpoint, he interpolates scenes from the life of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, revealing him to be, yes, privileged and insulated, but also a loving family man, a reluctant leader, and also an optimist (charmingly naive in his own way) regarding human nature. If anything, he was predisposed, as Rehr portrays him, against exacerbating the tensions that would lead to war; more’s the tragedy.

Rehr’s even-handedness speaks to his humanistic underpinnings: whatever you think of his actions, Gavrilo’s concerns for his people were heartfelt. Whatever the cruelties of the Hapsburg Empire, Franz did not deserve to be gunned down in cold blood. (There is also a fatalistic irony at play as the author traces the combination of incompetence, botched plans and sheer chance that ultimately led to the fateful act.)

The subtlety of Rehr’s approach extends to his art, which is gorgeous throughout: beautifully composed, convincingly researched without being cluttered, the occasionally dense storytelling broken up by poetic vignettes of starkly lyrical black and white. This is especially true in the largely wordless coda, the powerful imagery of which recalls the work of the legendary Frans Masereel.

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In trying to condense a massive amount of complex information, Rehr does occasionally commit the misstep of having his characters narrate history through their dialogue. And as Gavrilo’s coterie grows, it sometimes becomes difficult (to these American eyes at least) to keep track of everyone amongst all those dark moustaches and names with too many consonants.

These are quibbles of course. Terrorist takes an impressive spot amongst the burgeoning field of politically-minded, historical graphic works. In addition to the aforementioned Masereel, Rehr’s exploration of history’s intimate effects on people’s daily existence recalls Jason Lutes’ magisterial Berlin, as well as the works of the incomparable Joe Sacco. (In fact, one could construct a credible primer on the tragic twentieth century of the region by reading a ‘graphic trilogy’ comprised of Rehr’s book, the acclaimed Fatherland: A Family History by Nina Bunjevac, and Sacco’s masterpiece Safe Area Gorazde.) Comprising various approaches and styles, the underlying hope offered by these works is that by attempting to understand how outsize forces affect individual lives (their dreams, their failures, their loved ones, their deaths) we can, on some small level, alter the course of our troubled times, before our own lives become so much grist for some future account of catastrophic history.

Terrorist: Gavrilo Princip, the Assassin who Ignited World War I, published by Graphic Universe, is on sale now. 

I&N Print!: Mister X: Razed #2

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Hey I&Nmates!  How’s this for cool:

In the back Motter of the most recent issue of Mister X: Razed (Dark Horse)…

Mister X: Razed #2

Mister X: Razed #2

…Mr. Motter himself was kind enough–and ostensibly flattered enough–to make reference to a little honor that we bestowed upon his perfectly built Mister X: Eviction, our #1 book of 2013.

Check it out:

FullSizeRender-4

What a surprise, right?  As it is, I’m not much of a back matter reader; so you might imagine my reaction as I happened upon “Innie Award.”

You’d be correct if you imagined that I erupted in expletives–very holy expletives.

Speaking of holy: we’d like to thank the godly Mr. Motter for giving us a shout out–and, of course, for his bar-razing follow-up to Eviction, which is already positioning itself for a run at our Top Ten of 2015!

Turning pages–all of them from now on!

Scott

 

 

What’s I&N Store (4/8)

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Here’s What’s I&N Store: The Spring Break Edition.  It’s a lot like the MTV Spring Break shows of the late-’80s, just without the alcohol and the butt floss.

OK, so it’s nothing like the MTV Spring Break shows of the ’80s.

  • Rebels #1 (Dark Horse):  Just I&N and I&N Demand I’m grabbing this one and I’m grabbing it fast!  How fast?  Howard Fast–that how fast.  Man.  That’s pretty damn fast.  It’s not as fast as I’d like, though.  See: my guy doesn’t open until Noon.  So, instead of picking up my book on a fine April morning, I’ll be picking it up in the afternoon.  Hey: either way, it works for me.  I’m just excited to get something original from Brian Wood, one of our favorite writers.  In fact, his recently completed Dark Horse series earned the #5 spot in our Top Ten of 2014.  But this–this–may be an even more massive undertaking.  There’s a Revolution calling–and I’m picking up.  Fast.
Rebels #1

Rebels #1

  • Astro City #22 (DC/Vertigo): You know, it’s funny: I didn’t care for the Quarrel arc at all until, wouldn’t you know, “The End of the Trail.”  #21 hit some decent notes, including the all-in, action-packed opening and the honesty that fueled the resolution.  But as someone who has been critical of the arc, I found the final page the most honest bit of writing that Busiek has done outside of The Autumnlands: Tooth & Claw lo these last several months.  I know, I know: I’m hearing what I want to hear; but, come on, it’s pretty remarkable that Samaritan says, “There’s got to be a better way than this.  We’re losing people we shouldn’t lose.”  Um, yeah!  Hello!  “Good hearts, good minds.”  My heart!  My mind!  “There’s got to be a fix”–yes, indeed!  “We can’t leave it like this…”  Mr. Busiek, I suspect you won’t.  That’s why I’m willing to stick around.  Good talk, by the way.
  • Convergence #1 (DC): Ouch.  Dan Jurgen’s super-redundant #0 left me feeling super-loopy; it left me feeling like I want to be left out of the latest reboot loop.  Are we kicking things off in the Bizarro world or something?  Because I can’t imagine that Scott Lobdell’s name is much of a selling point nowadays.  I guess if your plan is to destroy the Universe as we know it…
  • Copperhead #6 (Image): Copperhead started off really, really well.  Then it became, well, pretty run-of-the-mill.  Hey, I get it: it’s tough to keep the magic going.  Correspondingly, it gets tougher to keep the money flowing.
  • Descender #2 (Image): Look: #1 was OK.  It was familiar and cheesy and did what it needed to do for a first issue.  But it wasn’t the big book that many of the review sites built it up to be.  Gotta give my man Derek props for his prediction, which may or may not play out: he expects Descender to play out a lot like Sweet Tooth, which I haven’t read.  I do know, however, that Lemire’s not afraid to lean on stuff he’s already written.  I’m willing to go at least two deep to see if he’s got something new–at least in my sphere–something that’ll hit me like Essex County or Trillium.
  • Nameless #3 (Image): I&N Demand Let’s be honest with each other: #1 wasn’t all that good.  (Granted, it was a #1–even more, it was a Morrison #1.)  #2, however, asserted very adamantly, “We’re all good,”  what with that terrific twist and all.  So, yeah, I’m glad I didn’t cross this one off of my list.  It may claim to be Nameless, but it’s kinda Namemore, isn’t it?  I mean, Morrison and Burnham are names that sell, names that deliver.  Scott Lobdell, however…
Nameless #3

Nameless #3

  • ODY-C #4 (Image): There’s something messy about it, but I’m still digging it.
  • Saga #27 (Image): Saga always leaves me foaming at the mouth.
  • The Surface #2 (Image): I don’t know: I didn’t like #1 very much.  Might be because I’m stupid.  Might also be because Ales Kot–who’s killing it on Zero, our #7 book of 2014–can be pretty incomprehensible at times.  No, really: I skimmed through it.  I never skim through a comic.  I skimmed through this one, though, because I couldn’t connect to it.  Odd, right?  Especially considering the clever social commentary about being hyper-connected…
  • All-New Hawkeye #2 (Marvel): Fraction’s baby should’ve been put to sleep for good.  But it wasn’t.  Instead, Lemire’s in charge; and, as usual, he’s reaching into his quiver of tricks–this time back-waaaaaaay back–to Trillium.  That’s right: the last page, if anything, was a flipping warning.  Yeah, I’m leaning toward passing.
  • Ant-Man #4 (Marvel) I&N Demand Ant-Man is a big book–a huge book!  We loved #2 enough to name it one of our Top 5 Books of February.  #3 was pretty awesome, too.  I mean, c’mon: the Taskmaster?  And how about the line of the year so far: “Pick a theme!”  Yeah, I laughed out loud.  Thank you, Mr. Spencer!  Something tells me that we’ll be celebrating your book again!  Yeah, it’s more than just a little vice at this point, ain’t it?
Ant-Man #4

Ant-Man #4

  • Evil Empire #12 (BOOM!): Suddenly, I’m not so excited about Evil Empire.  Doesn’t feel as tight.  And, if I’m being honest, Victor Santos’s art hasn’t lived up to the standard set by those who have come before him.  I’m pretty invested at this point, so I can’t imagine jumping off.

Avery’s Pick of the Week

  • Scooby Doo Where Are You? #56 (DC): Of all of the comics I’ve bought for Avery, the ones I reread the most are Scooby Doo books.  She loves the big reveals!
  • My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #2 (IDW):  That’s right: my baby girl loves her some evil ponies.
My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #2

My Little Pony: Fiendship Is Magic #2

What are you looking forward to this week?

Turning pages,

Scott

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